Verbs that start with P

List of verbs that start with P

Verbs are things you do. Action words!

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Packing

You pack a suitcase when you go away on vacation. Packing something means putting things inside it until it is full. You can pack a suitcase, boxes or even pack a wardrobe full of things.

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Pat

Photo of a hand patting a small dog
Photo by Sleepyneko
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You pat something when you touch it with the palm of your hand. People usually pat dogs and cats on the head, or give each other a pat on the back for a job well done.
A very similar word to pat is stroke, where you run your hand along something slowly as you are patting it.

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Peck

A peck is a quick movement made by birds when they eat, hitting their beaks against something. Birds also peck to do damage, for example woodpeckers make holes by pecking.
A movement similar to a bird's peck is also called a peck, for example "she gave him a quick peck on the cheek".

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Peek

Photo of a cat peeking
Photo by Tom Thai
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You peek when you quickly look at something from a hiding place, where you think no-one will see you. The cat in the picture is peeking out from behind a cupboard.

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Pierce

You pierce something by making a hole in it with something sharp and pointed, like a skewer or a dagger.

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Pinch

You pinch something when you grab it tightly between your forefinger and thumb.
Pinching is also a word for any similar motion to pinching with your hands, or something that feels like pinching. For example, "my new shoes pinch my feet".

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Play

You play when you do something just for the fun of it. The child in the picture is playing.

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Please

Photo of a stencil of the word please
Photo by amyscoop
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Please is a word you add to a request to make it nicer and more polite. You are more likely to get what you want if you say please.
Used as a verb, please means to make someone feel good or happy, for example "I did it just to please you".

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Pluck

You pluck something by pulling it off at the growing point. People commonly pluck out hairs from their eyebrows, pluck fruit from a tree or vine, or most commonly pluck the feathers from a bird like a chicken to prepare it for cooking. The chicken in the picture has been plucked everywhere except its wings.
Plucking can also describe a short, sharp way of playing an instrument like a guitar, or even be used as another word for courage, as in "he has a lot of pluck".

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Poke

You poke something by taking something pointy and pushing it into something else, but not so hard it does any damage. You can poke people with your finger to get their attention, or poke something with a stick to see how hard or soft it is.